This prospective study aimed to identify modifiable risk facts for falling in older people with mild to moderate dementia.

The authors undertook a qualitative study involving thematic analysis to explore the perceptions of older people with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment and their family carers, about falling, fall risk and acceptability of fall prevention interventions. 

This in-depth guide is divided into 8 sections with step-by-step guidance to help you make home as safe as possible for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia. Topics include:  Ensuring safety inside the home, handling social events, communicating effectively, and preparing for emergency situations. 

 

A food blog has put together this comprehensive guide encompassing the cognitive, emotional, and other health-related benefits of cooking for people with Alzheimer’s disease, how to create a safe environment for cooking and baking, ways caregivers can assist to make the activity enjoyable, and addressing eating challenges that may arise among individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s disease affects about 5.4 million Americans, about 5.2 million of which are 65 and older. It can be your grandparent, your cousin, your sibling or even your parent who faces the diagnosis. Eventually, those with Alzheimer’s require round-the-clock care, and for many families, that means taking the loved one into their own home.

Accurate information and continued research on the aging process are critical as Americans age. This brochure contains information about older Americans and attempts to dispel the myths regarding that age group. What's important to remember about people over age 65 is that while many begin to experience some physical limitations, they learn to live with them and lead happy and productive lives.

How to Make Cooking a Safe and Enjoyable Experience for Someone with Alzheimer’s, cooking offers many benefits for people who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, yet it can also be a dangerous activity if the person experiences certain symptoms of the disease and participates in cooking activities without proper supervision and preparation. 

The author argues that we need to support people with dementia to cope with an existential crisis.  12 pages.  Last reviewed January 2017.

This research paper commissioned by the Law Commission of Ontario describes the work in gathering evidence regarding the needs and wishes of patients, caregivers and stakeholders about care at the end of life in their own words.  111 pages.  Last reviewed January 4, 2017.

This artcile reviews the neurocognitive and neuropathologic changes after TBI with particular focus on the potential risk for cognitive decline across the life span in military service members. Implications for monitoring and surveillance of cognition in the aging military population are discussed.

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