Social isolation is a reality experienced by many seniors and particularly immigrant and refugee seniors. Even though it is not easy to recognize, it has significant health, social, and economic consequences. The Government of Canada has taken an active interest in the issue of social isolation as have provincial governments. At the community level, several organizations individually and in partnerships, have been actively engaged in offering programs and services to seniors at risk for social isolation.

Using data on adults ages 55 and over from the second wave of the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH-2), this study models the main and interactive effects of religious involvement and race/ethnicity on four items of attitudes towards intergenerational assistance. 

This study is a needs assessment of ethnic Chinese older adults in Japan. The needs were matched with a city’s Health, Welfare, and Long-term Care Insurance Program Plan seeking to identify differences between ethnic Chinese and Japanese community members.

This article analyzes the effects of societal perception on treatment of the elderly and how people view and perceive the aging process varies greatly from culture to culture.

The elderly population of the future may not look much like the old people of today. It will be less white and with fewer native English speakers. That means physicians, nurses, social workers and health aides will have to adapt to our increasingly diverse society.

Rates of caregiving vary somewhat by ethnicity. For example, among the U.S. adult population, approximately one-fifth of both the non-Hispanic White and African-American populations are providing care to a Asian caregiverloved one, while a slightly lower percentage of Asian-Americans — 18 percent — and Hispanic Americans — 16 percent — are engaged in caregiving.

This presentation aims to raise awareness of and enhance the care for people at end of life including how to understand how cultural factors influence end of life decision making.  

Quality palliative care helps you honour your culture, spirituality and traditions. At LivingMyCulture.ca, people from various cultures share their stories and wisdom about living with serious illness, end of life and grief to support others.

The focus of this article will be on cross-cultural issues at the end of life for ethnically and culturally diverse groups in the United States. The health care provider must have a clear understanding and recognition of the unique and specific influences culture has on a patient’s behavior, attitudes, preferences, and decisions around end-of-life care. 

Social isolation can often pose serious health threats to the senior population, and it’s more common than most people may think. It’s important to foster an environment where seniors can stay socially engaged as they get older. Here are some ways to promote social health, connectedness and help seniors avoid social isolation.

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