FASTlinks is a series of web-based maps that display links for elder care services in South East Ontario organized into 10 common elder care domains. The 10 domains are organized by function, rather than disease diagnosis. FASTlinks was developed by the CSAH in collaboration with the Aging with Co-morbidities Network.

Baycrest Health Sciences in partnership with North East Specialized Geriatric Centre, will hold Cycle 3 of "Project ECHO Care of the Elderly" (ECHO COE) from January 8, 2018 – March 19, 2019 on Tuesdays 11:00am-12:00 pm. The goal of this free telehealth education program is to enhance the quality of care for older adults in Ontario, by improving the knowledge and skills of health care providers. To learn more click here.


Highlights of this issue include a reading list on "Social Capital & Older Age,” updates from AGEWELL, Alzheimer Society of Ontario, Baycrest, Brainxchange, Bruyere Research Institute, Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging, Centre for Studies in Aging and Health, Gilbrea Centre for Studies in Aging, Institute for Life Course & Aging, National Institute on Ageing, Ontario Age-Friendly Communities Outreach Program,Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, Ontario Osteoporosis Strategy and Regional Geriatric Program of Toronto and Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging and SE Research.

Information about funding opportunities and calls for abstracts from AGE-WELL, Canadian Hospice Palliative Care, Canadian Insitutes of Health Research, Ontario Brain Institute, Public Health Agency of Canada, Retired Teachers of Ontario Foundation and Weston Brain Institute are included.  A number of upcoming events and educational opportunities are listed. Sign up to receive Linkages directly here.

Senior Friendly Care

Friday, January 25, 2019, 12 PM EST - In this presentation, Dr. Martha Spencer (Providence Health Care Associate Program Director, Division of Geriatric Medicine, UBC and Department of Medicine Clinical Instructor, UBC) will discuss the approach to the diagnosis, investigation and management of urinary incontinence in older adults. The focus will be on medical causes of incontinence and medical approaches (lifestyle, behavioural and pharmacological) to treatment.

Monday, January 14, 2019 from 12-1PM EST.  The Division of Geriatric Medicine in collaboration with the Centre for Studies in Aging & Health and the Seniors Health Knowledge Network are pleased to offer this free webinar presentation featuring Tim Yearington (Grey Thunderbird), Algonquin Traditional Knowledge Keeper from the Office of Indigenous Initiatives of Queen's University.

Learning objectives include to review population health concerns, disease prevalence and risk factors; to understand the role of Elders in Indigenous communities and to introduce Indigenous perspectives of health and end-of-life. To learn more or to register click here.

The SF7 Toolkit supports clinical best practices for healthcare providers across the sectors of care and includes self-management tools for older adults and their caregivers. The toolkit provides a common practice framework that complements the unique skills and practices of the various care providers helping older adults. SF7 focuses on seven clinical areas that support resilience, independence, and quality of life: cognition (particularly delirium), mobility, social engagement, continence, pain, nutrition, and polypharmacy. The SF7 toolkit is available by individual topic, or bundled together. 89 pages. Last reviewed November 2018.

This presentation featuring Dr. Sharon Cohen is now available to view online.  In the recording she discusses the biomarkers that are shaping thinking on how Alzheimer's disease is diagnosed and how professionals should be approaching treatment opportunities through clinical trials. Watch the video here.

The Centre for Studies in Aging & Health was pleased to feature PhD Candidate Atul Jaiswal for this free Research & Innovation in Aging Forum webinar introducing the condition of dual sensory loss or deafblindness. The characteristics, epidemioogy and impact of dual sensory loss on life were explored. The unique participation experiences of three categories of individuals in this population was discussed. 

Presenter:

Atul Jaiswal is a final year doctoral candidate at the School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University. Atul is from India, where he previously worked for five years as an Occupational Therapist, disability rehabilitation social worker, and Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) professional. He received a gold medal during his Master’s degree in Social Work in Disability Studies and wasinstrumental in initiating a successful advocacy campaign for people with disabilities(resulting in sanction of INR 15 millionduring his fellowship. He is a recipient of Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarship and currently pursuing his doctoral research to understand the participation experiences of persons with deafblindness and ways to enhance their participation in society. His current work also focuses on understanding the use of assistive technology for people with deafblindness. To know more visit https://twitter.com/atuljais111

Additional Resources:

Currently, in Ontario, and in most other provinces, there is great variation in the way BMD (Bone Mineral Density) test referrals are made. BMD testing measures bone mass, indicating whether someone has osteoporosis or is at risk, and plays an important role in the reduction of morbidity and mortality related to fractures. It is therefore important to standardize BMD requisitions, to ensure appropriate ndividuals get tested for osteoporosis risk.

This inventory of fall prevention resources and learning opportunities is designed to support those who are caring for a loved one living with dementia or cognitive impairment to understand the risks of falls and create plans to reduce the risks. It is a ‘living’ document that should continue to grow as additional resources and learning opportunities are located. The resources that are noted below have been organized by a topic framework and prefaced by description of what the evidence indicates in the references. 38 pages. Last reviewed October 2018.

Pages